Tuesday, January 22, 2008

Wordless 55

This woman is probably the first female U.S. citizen to experience discrimination in the workplace because of her gender.

Do you know who she is?

You can see other Wordless Wednesday sites here

UPDATE: This is Mary Katherine Goddard. Cara gets the gold star for correctly identifying the nation’s first postmistress and a printer of the Declaration of Independence. I won’t be posting about her, but you can find out more about her here and here. This link concerns her appeal to get her job back and this one shows in her own handwriting her appeal found in the papers of George Washington.


26 comments:

Starrlight said...

Betsy Ross! No clue, she is just the first person who popped into my mind.

Natalie said...

I have absolutely no idea, sorry.

Shesawriter said...

I have no idea. :-(

My Wordless Wednesday: Tribute to Heath Ledger

Utah Mommy said...

I don't know who she is but seems she so interesting woman. Happy WW!

EHT said...

Actually Starlight you are in the right time period, but the woman in the image is not B. Ross.

My subject this week did unusual things for women during her time period.

Gattina said...

It can't be my grandma because she didn't imigrate and then I have to say she was more beautiful then this one, so I am sorry to say I have no clue !

Nissa said...

It looks like Alexander Hamilton's twin sister.. yikes. I have no clue who it could actually be!

Happy WW!

Ari_1965 said...

Abigail Adams?

justjessie said...

Hmm, I love history, but I can't think who it could be. Got any more hints?

Cara said...

Mary Katherine Goddard -

julia said...

This is a great idea for Wordless Wednesday. I can't think of who it is, either - and now I just have to know.

EHT said...

Nope....not Abigail, not a relation of Alexander Hamilton, but from the same time period.

Hint: This person just loves the weather.....any type, and the word "type" has something to do with her as well.

We know of course, there were no typewriters in the late 1700s, so what else might the word "type" mean regarding our poor female who was looked down upon because of her gender.

Tendrils said...

hmmmmmm.....you got me. I'll be checking back for an answer! :) Happy WW! WHat a great idea!

Wright said...

Wow - that's hard. I have no idea, but can't wait to hear who it is!

Cara said...

Mary Katherine Goddard?!

the teach said...

No idea, eht.

EHT said...

Thank you for commenting again Cara. I missed your first comment when I gave another hint.

You are very correct. How did you know that?

hippyhappyhay said...

Looks like I missed the bus, not that knew anyway lol. Abput the only historical american woman I know of is Dorothea Dix :).
Great WW!

Robert said...

It's not Anita Hill, is it!? Ha ha. I have no idea but thanks for the picture and the test...which I obviously failed.

Livin' With Me said...

I would have never known- but I see you've already answered anyways. Oh well- I've never done very well in History.

Sandy Carlson said...

Time to go Google Mary Catherine Goddard.

Andrea said...

Hmmm...I'm from Canada so I don't really know who that would be. Sorry. :)

Nap Warden said...

Well, I never would have known that....

The Tour Marm said...

I have never seen a picture of her!

I think that she had something to do with the printing of the Declaration of Independence.

EHT said...

I was actually surprised to find a picture even if it is a drawing. I've never had one for classroom use.

While a man is credited with the first printing of the Declaration of Independence we remember her for printing the copies with all of the signatures. Later she served as a postmaster and was eventually removed because she was a woman.

The Tour Marm said...

If I recall something that was told to me years ago by a NPS Ranger at the Franklin Court printing office in Philadelphia, she had served for more than a decade as 'Postmistress' but they decided she was too old to ride the circuit. So it wasn't just gender bias, but age bias!